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The 20 Most Successful Shark Tank Products Ever

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Fans of business reality TV shows will already be familiar with the premise of ABC’s Shark Tank, the show where business founders pitch their products to a panel of real investors (the “Sharks”) in the hopes of convincing them to back their young companies.

Now running for 13 seasons and counting, Shark Tank has seen a plethora of products come and go. Of course, only some of the business ideas have been good enough to earn investments from the show’s Sharks and achieve success.

We’ve already written about the failed Shark Tank products. On this occasion, instead, we’ll analyze some of the most successful Shark Tank products to hit the air over the years.

20 Most Successful Shark Tank Products

20) Bala Bangles

Bala Bangles

Bala Bangles description: Bala Bangles are wrist weights that come in a variety of colors, patterns, and weight options. They were designed as a more comfortable alternative to existing wrist weights.

Business metrics: $2.5 million in sales.

Bala Bangles’ founders: Natalie Holloway and Max Kislevitz.

Bala Bangles on Shark Tank: Season 11, Episode 13.

Investment: Maria Sharapova and Mark Cuban invested $900,000 for a 30% stake.

19) Sand Cloud

Sand Cloud

Sand Cloud description: Sand Cloud manufactures lightweight beach towels made from Turkish cotton. Everything is designed with sustainability in mind, from their packaging to their products, with the ultimate goal of helping save marine life.

Business metrics: $20 million in sales.

Sand Cloud’s founders: Brandon Leibel, Bruno Aschidamini, and Steven Ford.

Sand Cloud on Shark Tank: Season 8, Episode 18

Investment: Robert Herjavec invested $200,000 for a 15% stake.

18) PhoneSoap

PhoneSoap

PhoneSoap description: PhoneSoap is a combination smartphone charger and sterilizer that uses UV light to kill 99.9% of the germs on your phone’s surfaces while it charges. The unique charging case encloses your phone completely to sterilize it from every angle.

Business metrics: $150 million in sales.

PhoneSoap’s founders: Wesley Laporte and Dan Barnes.

PhoneSoap on Shark Tank: Season 6, Episode 24.

Investment: Lori Greiner invested $300,000 for a 10% stake.

17) Bottle Breacher

Bottle Breacher

Bottle Breacher description: The Bottle Breacher is a bottle opener fashioned out of a decommissioned 50-caliber bullet. Bottle Breacher is a veteran-owned company, and a portion of the sales of each bottle opener goes towards non-profit military organizations.

Business metrics: $15 million in sales.

Bottle Breacher’s founders: Eli and Jen Crane.

Bottle Breacher on Shark Tank: Season 6, Episode 8

Investment: Mark Cuban and Kevin O’Leary invested $150,000 for a 20% stake.

16) Bantam Bagels

Bantam Bagels

Bantam Bagels description: Who doesn’t love mini, bite-sized food items? That’s exactly why Bantam Bagels became another Shark Tank success story with their freezer-friendly, cream cheese-filled bagel bites.

Business metrics: $20 million in annual sales.

Bantam Bagels’ founders: Nick and Elyse Oleksak.

Bantam Bagels on Shark Tank: Season 6, Episode 11

Investment: Lori Greiner invested $275K for a 25% stake.

15) EverlyWell

EverlyWell

EverlyWell description: EverlyWell offers at-home sample collecting and lab testing kits for 30+ ailments, including, most recently, COVID-19. The company aims to transform the medical lab testing market, providing customers with easy-to-use and understandable test results.

Business metrics: EverlyWell is valued at $2.9 billion.

EverlyWell’s founder: Julia Cheeks.

EverlyWell on Shark Tank: Season 9, Episode 12

Investment: Lori Greiner invested $1 million for a 5% stake.

14) Grace and Lace

Grace and Lace

Grace and Lace description: Grace and Lace is a women’s clothing and accessories company. At the time of their Shark Tank pitch, the company was focused on lacy socks that combined perfectly with women’s boots.

Business metrics: $20 million in sales.

Grace and Lace’s founders: Rick and Melissa Hinnant.

Grace and Lace on Shark Tank: Season 5, Episode 10

Investment: Barbara Corcoran invested $175,000 for a 10% stake.

13) Drop Stop

Drop Stop

Drop Stop description: Drop Stop is a car seat gap filler that fits right into the space between your car seat and the center console (with a slot for your seat belt to fit into) to prevent anything from falling into the space, especially while you’re driving.

Business metrics: $24 million in sales.

Drop Stop’s founders: Marc Newburger and Jeffrey Simon.

Drop Stop on Shark Tank: Season 4, Episode 20

Investment: Lori Greiner invested $300,000 for a 20% stake.

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12) Groovebook

Groovebook

GrooveBook description: GrooveBook is an app that allows social media users to flag photos and request physical prints of them in customized photo books. While GrooveBook was discontinued in 2022, it was still a Shark Tank success story for its founders and the Sharks who invested in the idea.

Business metrics: Shutterfly acquired GrooveBook in 2015 for $14.5 million.

GrooveBook’s founders: Julie and Brian Whiteman.

GrooveBook on Shark Tank: Season 5, Episode 13.

Investment: Mark Cuban and Kevin O'Leary invested $150,000 for 80% of the licensing rights.

11) Stasher Bags

Stasher Bags

Stasher Bags description: Stasher Bags are reusable, eco-friendly food storage bags designed to replace traditional single-use plastic bags. The bags are made with food-grade silicone and come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes.

Business metrics: $12 million in annual revenue.

Stasher Bags’ founder: Kat Nouri.

Stasher Bags on Shark Tank: Season 9, Episode 16. 

Investment: Mark Cuban invested $400,000 for a 15% stake.

10) ReadeREST

ReadeREST description: ReadeREST is a magnetic pocket clip that lets you hang your glasses to the front of your shirt when you’re not using them, so you’ll never misplace your reading glasses again.

Business metrics: $27 million in sales.

ReadeREST’s founder: Rick Hopper.

ReadeREST on Shark Tank: Season 3, Episode 2.

Investment: Lori Greiner invested $150,000 for a 65% percent stake.

9) Safe Grabs

Safe Grabs

Safe Grabs description: Safe Grabs makes silicone mats designed to fit in your microwave, under bowls and plates. When you’re done heating up your food, you use the mat to pick up the hot dish and avoid burns.

Business metrics: $5 million in sales.

Safe Grabs’ founder: Cyndi Lee.

[Product Name] on Shark Tank: Season 8, Episode 5.

Investment: Lori Greiner invested $75,000 for a 25% stake.

8) Sleep Styler

Sleep Styler description: Sleep Styler is a company making memory foam-based, heat-free hair rollers that you can leave in your hair overnight, thus styling your hair in your sleep, saving time and avoiding hassle in the morning.

Business metrics: $100 million in sales.

Sleep Styler’s founder: Tara Brown.

Sleep Styler on Shark Tank: Season 8, Episode 19.

Investment: Lori Greiner invested $75,000 for a 25% stake.

7) The Bouqs

The Bouqs

The Bouqs description: The Bouqs is an online flower retailer that partners with eco-friendly flower farms and cuts out the middlemen between flower growers and buyers, resulting in prices up to 80% lower for customers.

Business metrics: $100 million in sales.

The Bouqs’ founder: John Tabis.

The Bouqs on Shark Tank: Season 5, Episode 27.

Investment: Robert Herjavec invested an undisclosed amount 3 years after Bouqs appeared on Shark Tank.

6) Tipsy Elves

Tipsy Elves

Tipsy Elves description: Tipsy Elves is a brand offering ugly Christmas sweaters and other holiday-themed apparel. While Christmas sweaters aren’t a new concept, Tipsy Elves brought them off thrift store racks and into the mainstream.

Business metrics: $125 million in sales.

Tipsy Elves' founders: Nick Morton and Evan Mendelsohn.

Tipsy Elves on Shark Tank: Season 5, Episode 12.

Investment: Robert Herjavec invested $100,000 for a 10% stake.

5) The Comfy

The Comfy

The Comfy description: The Comfy is a wearable hoodie-blanket. “The Blanket You Wear” is available in all sorts of plush, fleece-lined styles and designs, and has inspired plenty of copycat products since appearing on Shark Tank.

Business metrics: $250 million in sales.

The Comfy’s founders: Brian and Michael Speciale.

The Comfy on Shark Tank: Season 9, Episode 10.

Investment: Barbara Corcoran invested $50,000 for a 30% stake.

4) Simply Fit Board

Simply Fit Board description: Simply Fit Board is an exercise board designed to help you strengthen your core by balancing on it and twisting back and forth. Think of it as a stationary skateboard without any wheels.

Business metrics: $160 million in sales.

Simply Fit Board’s founders: Gloria Hoffman and Linda Clark.

Simply Fit Board on Shark Tank: Season 7, Episode 8.

Investment: Lori Greiner invested $125,000 for a 20% stake.

3) Squatty Potty

Squatty Potty

Squatty Potty description: Squatty Potty is a stool designed to be placed on the floor in front of your toilet to help make doing your bathroom business easier by changing the position of your legs when you sit down on the toilet.

Business metrics: $175 million in sales.

Squatty Potty’s founder: Bobby Edwards.

Squatty Potty on Shark Tank: Season 6, Episode 9

Investment: Lori Greiner invested $350,000 for a 10% stake.

2) Scrub Daddy

Scrub Daddy

Scrub Daddy description: Scrub Daddy is a smiley face-shaped sponge that changes hardness depending on water temperature, becoming more firm under cold water and softer under hot water. The double-sided mouth portion of the sponge’s smiley face design is intended to make scrubbing utensils easier.

Business metrics: $209 million in sales.

Scrub Daddy’s founder: Aaron Krause.

Scrub Daddy on Shark Tank: Season 4, Episode 7.

Investment: Lori Greiner invested $200,000 for a 20% stake.

1) Bombas

Bombas

Bombas description: Bombas is a comfort-focused sock brand with a philanthropic mission — for every pair of socks purchased, another gets donated to an organization that helps homeless people. The founders of Bombas were inspired by finding out that socks are one of the most-needed items at homeless shelters.

Business metrics: $225 million in sales.

Bombas’ founders: David Heath and Randy Goldberg.

Bombas on Shark Tank: Season 6, Episode 1

Investment: Daymond John invested $200,000 for a 17.5% stake.

What is the most successful Shark Tank product ever?

Based on lifetime sales metrics, money raised on Shark Tank, and post-show sales performance, Bombas is the most successful product from Shark Tank. 

After the episode of Shark Tank featuring Bombas aired in 2014, during which Bombas’ founders raised $200,000, the company allegedly sold out its inventory in just two weeks, which equaled about $1.2 million in sales.

Bombas didn’t slow down after that, either, as the company has now amassed an impressive $225+ million in lifetime sales. While its focus is still on socks, Bombas has since branched out into other comfort clothing, including T-shirts, slippers, and underwear. 

Bombas and its founders still stand by their original principles of helping homeless populations, and have donated more than 50 million clothing items through 3,500+ local Giving Partners across the United States.

What is the least successful product on Shark Tank?

There have been many products that have earned investments on Shark Tank, but went on to fail. Perhaps one of the biggest Shark Tank fails was a product called Toygaroo, a toy rental company that aimed to be the “Netflix of toys.”

Although the company’s pitch was enough to convince Mark Cuban and Kevin O’Leary to invest $200,000 in exchange for 35% of the company in 2011, Toygaroo filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy just a year later. Toygaroo shut down operations permanently in 2016, so it’s safe to say the Sharks never got any of their investment back from this Shark Tank flop.

What Shark Tank product deal failed but then succeeded?

The most famous product that failed to make a deal with the Sharks, but then garnered huge success, is the Ring Doorbell (formerly known as Doorbot).

On Shark Tank, Kevin O’Leary made an offer of $700k in exchange for 5% equity and 10% royalties, which would drop down to 7% after he earned back his initial investment of $700k. Ring’s founder, Jamie Siminoff, rejected the deal because he wasn’t open to giving up royalties in the company.

It turns out that Siminoff made the right decision, as Ring Doorbell later earned investments from Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, Qualcomm Ventures, Goldman Sachs, DFJ Growth, and Sir Richard Branson. Even Shaquille O’Neal holds equity in the company, which he received in return for being its spokesman in 2016.

This missed opportunity for the Sharks ended very well for Ring Doorbell’s founder and later investors, as Amazon acquired it in 2018 for a whopping $1 billion!

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